Unwrapping the new 2LP edition of Sgt. Pepper’s by The Beatles

1 June, as corroborated by Beatles expert Mark Lewisohn, will mark the 50th anniversary of the official release of  ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’. And of course, the world is celebrating with a series of new editions. Let’s unwrap the new double LP version.

When I bought it yesterday, I was once again pleasantly surprised by the visual richness of the album, which goes extremely well with the music.

Front sleeve (older version in the back, more about that below):

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Inside sleeve:

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Rear cover:

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The set contains a new and shiny stereo mix by Giles Martin, who previously produced the labyrinthic soundtrack album ‘Love’ together with his more famous dad George, and a second record, which features about fourteen interesting session outtakes. Among them: an instrumental version of Within You Without You, all sitar and tablas, and an alternative ending to A Day In The Life. A bit underwhelming, but of course that’s why the Fab Four left if off and went for a more thunderous option.

The Beatles Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band

The labels, roughly the same as the original UK 1967 release (Parlophone ‎– PMC 7027):

The DIY cut-out insert:

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The red half-tone print on white ‘psychedelic’ inner sleeves, also included in the first UK 1967 release:

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The all-new bright yellow folder, containing short introductions by Paul McCartney and detailing the story about the legendary cover, the recording sessions and the outtakes – click pictures to enlarge:

The back of the new fategold sleeve:

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One thing I find interesting is comparing different versions of a certain release – go on, call me a nerd 😉 Of course I already had a copy of ‘Sgt. Pepper’s’. Unfortunately not a first press of any kind, but still a rather neat French version of 1974 (Odeon/Apple Records‎– 2C 064 04177), which also had the cardboard cut-out insert, but not the ghost track you’ll hear when the needle slips into the run-out groove, right after the monumental end chord of A Day In The Life dies out. It also featured ‘Apple’ labels, instead of Parlophone labels. Of course, The Beatles only founded Apple Records in 1968.

A little comparison:

The Beatles Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band

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That’s it, folks. What do you think about the new package and mix? Oh right, the ghost track …

 

The Necks at De Singer 2017, in pictures

On 8 May 2017, experimental jazz trio The Necks took the stage in charming jazz club de Singer, well-hidden behind a row of houses in the small town of Rijkevorsel.

For a good hour and a half, piano player Chris Abrahams, bassist Lloyd Swanton and drummer/percussionist Tony Buck showcased their improvised chemistry, building two massive, entrancing soundscapes from the ground up and adding tension in microscopic portions, mechanically precise and merciless like a tropical thunderstorm.

These are the stills of that riotous evening. Click to enlarge, enjoy and go check out The Necks whenever you get the chance! All pictures: ©Philip Hermans 2017.


You might also like my list of cinematic jazz albums.
Read ‘Machine Gun: a Rapid-fire History of Epic Jazz (1960-2015)’.

Snarky Puppy - Streaming isn't paying artists

Snarky Puppy’s Michael League: “Streaming doesn’t pay artists”

As much as I love Spotify for discovering new music, I’m fully aware of the fact that streaming isn’t paying the actual bands and musicians the way it should – luckily I’m also an avid record collector. At last week’s Snarky Puppy show in Brussels, bandleader Michael League had a few interesting to say on the subject. His sincere message left an impression on me. That’s why I’d like to present to you in full.

Right after a blistering version of Lingus and before launching into the encore What About Me, Michael League addressed the sold-out Ancienne Belgique:

“We’re fortunate because we are able to play in a room like this, and sell some tickets and survive playing music. But that’s not the case for many, many, many artists who are more talented than ourselves and I just wanna make you aware, very briefly, that as wonderful of a thing as streaming is – and Spotify and Pandora and YouTube – I wanna let you know that although those companies are doing very well and labels are doing very well, the only people that don’t get paid for streaming are [scream from the audience] … artists. You got it. So while we are fortunate, there are many incredible artists who deserve for their music to be heard and they can’t survive if you don’t support them. So I just wanna put a big shout out. If there any artists, Belgian or American of English or whatever, that you love and you want them to succeed, you want them go on, please buy their records and buy tickets cause streaming is not supporting them. It’s only listening. Ask any musician, they’ll tell you.”

What’s even more laudable is that Michael isn’t just talking about Snarky, or about his own magnificent label GroudUp Music (David Crosby, Becca Stevens, House of Waters, Forq, Bill Laurance, …) – check it out! His message concerns all recording artists and deserves to be shared. Have fun buying cool stuff on vinyl, tape, cd or online!

R. Stevie Moore and Jason Falkner 'Make It Be' Album Cover

‘Make It Be’ by R. Stevie Moore and Jason Falkner – Deranged radio show // Review

Nashville lo-fi legend and “godfather of home recording” R. Stevie Moore (RSM) puts out albums and nutty pop songs with remarkable ease, most of them self-released as tapes and cd-r’s. From time to time indie labels have shown interest in Stevie’s recordings too and at the turn of the century he won a zealous supporter in Ariel Pink, who introduced the bedroom work aesthetic of his mentor to an entire new generation. ‘Make It Be’, the latest in a series of over 400 DIY releases, now marks a new milestone in that wonderfully peculiar 50 year career.  

On ‘Make It Be’, R. Stevie Moore – usually a lone wolf, occasionally a keen collaborator – seeks assistance from power pop stalwart Jason Falkner. The result is a delightful album, destined to one day become some sort of lost, overlooked classic.

R Stevie Moore Jason Falkner Bar None Records

Credit: Bar None Records

Not some random dude

I knew RSM, but Falkner I didn’t. So I did some research and found he’s not just some random dude either. Falkner’s career immediately took off on a high note with well-established band The Three O’Clock, in the latter part of the eighties. Later he joined Jellyfish and The Grays and contributed to music by Air, Beck and even Paul McCartney. Recently Falkner produced albums by Syd Arthur (‘Apricity’) and Emitt ‘The One Man Beatles’ Rhodes (‘Rainbow Ends’). Like I said, not some random dude.

From Fab Four to Phonow Wow

Falkner and Moore share a passion for The Beatles – in typical absurdist fashion, Stevie once referred to them as The Beatlegs. ‘Stevie Does The Beatles’, a Fab Four cover album, dates back to 1975 and when years later Cherry Red Records launched an RSM compilation, it was accompanied by an ironic twist on the sleeve of ‘Meet The Beatles’.

In the introduction to that concise career overview Nuno Monteiro and Richard Anderson wrote about Stevie’s early output: “The albums flow in a simultaneously fluid and fragmented fashion, taking on the guise of a deranged, experimental and highly creative radio show.” That is precisely the feeling you get when you put on ‘Make It Be’.

Meet The R. Stevie Moore mirrors Meet The Beatles

‘Meet The R. Stevie Moore’ mirrors ‘Meet The Beatles’

The first three tracks (I H8 People, Another Day Slips Away and I Love Us We Love Me), all rock solid pop songs, flow into each other seamlessly. What follows is a peculiar mix of hilarious spoken word pieces (Prohibited Permissions), guitar interludes and more addictive pop songs (Stamps, Sincero Amore, Play Myself Some Music).

You’re also treated to a cover of Don’t You Just Know It by Huey Piano Smith & Clowns, breezy meditative synth track Passed Away Today and finally, a rough idea for a blues shuffle dedicated to Falkner (Falkner’s Walk, or more accurately Phonow Wow).

Like a dream. Like a vapor

Most tracks are (co-)written by RSM – some were even fully conceived and recorded decades ago. Those revisited tracks offer the key to what Falkner, a prodigious arranger, is bringing to the table. Falkner gives Stevie’s progressive pop melodies a polish and a more texturized sound, without impacting the uniqueness of the material. If anything, Falkner adds an accessible layer and a Byrds-like sparkle to a body of work that has been underground, unknown and largely unloved for way too long.

Another Day Slips Awayfirst released in 2006, is the one song that will probably occupy a spot in your long-term memory. That’s because of its infectious beat, vertigo-like melodies and telegraph-style lyrics: “Sleep and eat, love, work and play. Another day slips away. Days rushing by. Moving at the speed of light like a dream. Like a vapor.”

Get stamps!

There’s brilliant guitar work throughout. Check out that one-off riff in the middle of I Love Us, We Love Me and the lead playing on Horror Show. That last song took shape in Falkner’s head, hence the Three O’Clock/Dukes of Stratosphear neo-psychedelic atmosphere.

Play Myself Some Music, originally recorded in 1986, sounds like it ran away at an ‘Oddessey And Oracle’ recording session and tripped over ‘Mummer’ by XTC. That’s Fine What Time on the other hand, seems to channel both Barry White and Giorgio Moroder.

‘Make it Be’ – the title another nod to the Beatles? – is full of great influences like that. And Moore and Falkner never fail to paint their own little universe. Moore’s trademark oddball humor is never far away. Stamps, for example, is a high-powered punk song about someone desperately in need of, well, stamps. If You See Kay makes use of cheeky wordplay. And I Am The Best For You features Stevie doing his best impression of Lemmy of Motörhead.

Elsewhere there are genuine heartfelt moments, like Stevie singing “Baby it’s true” in I Love Us, We Love Me and Jason delivering the wonderful Sincero Amore.

Eclectricity

At 18 songs, ‘Make It Be’ is a lot to digest. But if you like your music eccentric and your albums eclectic, chances are you’ll be hooked for weeks. At last, it seems, RSM succeeds in bringing his pop craftsmanship to a wider audience – and rightfully so. With a little help of his friend, Jason Falkner.